How Finland Appeared on the Map of Europe
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How Finland Appeared on the Map of Europe
Annotation
PII
S207987840016470-6-1
DOI
10.18254/S207987840016470-6
Publication type
Article
Status
Published
Authors
Vyacheslav Avtsinov 
Affiliation: Moscow State Linguistic University
Address: Russian Federation, Moscow
Abstract

This article studies Finland’s formation from the first mention of the Finns to the country's independence in 1917. The author touches upon the origin of the “Duke of Finland” and “Grand Duke of Finland” titles. During Swedish rule, a period that lasted more than 600 years, Finland did not represent a single community in terms of politics or administration. In the 17th — 19th centuries, its territory was divided into provinces, which had an equivalent status to Sweden’s provinces. Nevertheless, in the early years of the country's independence, a myth emerged in Finnish historiography about Sweden-Finland, which was allegedly a two-piece state, consisting of two equal and equal parts — Sweden and Finland. This myth persisted until late 1960s at least. Considerable attention is paid to the events of the Russian-Swedish war of 1808—1809, as a result of which Finland was annexed to Russia and the Grand Duchy of Finland was subsequently created. It was due to these events that Finland first appeared on the map of Europe as a self-governing territory within the Russian Empire. Finland as an independent state appeared on the map on 6 December, 1917. Considerable attention is paid to the events of the Russian-Swedish war of 1808—1809, as a result of which Finland was annexed to Russia, as well as the formation by Russia of the territory of the Grand Duchy of Finland. It was as a result of these actions that Finland first appeared on the map of Europe as a self-governing territory within the Russian Empire. The independent state of Finland appeared on the map on December 6, 1917.

Keywords
Finland, Sweden, Russia, Alexander I, The Treaty of Fredrikshamn 1809
Received
01.04.2021
Publication date
16.08.2021
Number of characters
24166
Number of purchasers
3
Views
114
Readers community rating
0.0 (0 votes)
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References

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