Arab Press Networks and Imperial Connectivities from Mediterranean Africa to France in the Late 19th Century
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Arab Press Networks and Imperial Connectivities from Mediterranean Africa to France in the Late 19th Century
Annotation
Title (other)
Сети по распространению арабской прессы и внутриимперские связи между Средиземноморской Африкой и Францией в конце XIX в.
PII
S207987840015283-0-1
DOI
10.18254/S207987840015283-0
Publication type
Article
Status
Published
Authors
Gavin Murray-Miller 
Affiliation: Cardiff University
Abstract

The press was an instrument of colonial governance. Yet newspapers and print also served to connect populations across borders and demonstrated how trans-imperial flows influenced empires. This article examines Arab print networks in North Africa and France. It argues that print networks assisted with processes of colonial expansion while also providing a forum for Muslim activists and Arab modernists to present their views to foreign audiences. This two-way channel illustrates how imperialism engendered new synergies that would influence political developments in both the French empire and the modern Middle East, suggesting that print networks were central to the entangled histories of empire in the modern period.

Keywords
French North Africa, Imperialism, Islamic politics, print, transnational history
Received
13.06.2021
Publication date
16.08.2021
Number of characters
39920
Number of purchasers
4
Views
304
Readers community rating
0.0 (0 votes)
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