The Reflection on the Confrontations between Kings and Magnates in the 15th Century Scottish Parliament: the Content of the Acts and the Main Concepts
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The Reflection on the Confrontations between Kings and Magnates in the 15th Century Scottish Parliament: the Content of the Acts and the Main Concepts
Annotation
PII
S207987840010120-1-1
DOI
10.18254/S207987840010120-1
Publication type
Article
Status
Published
Authors
Ksenia Reva 
Affiliation: Saint Petersburg State University
Address: Russian Federation, Saint Petersburg
Abstract

The article examines parliamentary statutes of personal rule of James I (1406—1437), James II (1437—1460) and James III (1460—1488). Parliamentary legislation of the 15th century tries to cover various spheres and aspects of social life. Reflection on the conflicts between the monarch and the elites was not an exception in this respect. The content of parliamentary decisions, no doubt, depended on the political context, but the used language was based on the existing legal tradition. Thus, a study of the results of the work of the Scottish assembly of estates, expressed in the statutes, and the rhetoric of the same acts allow us to trace the use and refraction of existing norms towards the political context.

Keywords
Medieval Scotland, Scottish Parliament, Parliamentary acts, James I, James II, James III
Received
18.02.2020
Publication date
30.07.2020
Number of characters
34572
Number of purchasers
5
Views
85
Readers community rating
0.0 (0 votes)
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