Between Historiography and Creation of Myth: Decolonization, (Counter)Insurgency and (Post)Imperial Syndrome
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Between Historiography and Creation of Myth: Decolonization, (Counter)Insurgency and (Post)Imperial Syndrome
Annotation
PII
S207987840002437-9-1
DOI
10.18254/S0002437-9-1
Publication type
Article
Status
Published
Authors
Stanislav Malkin 
Affiliation: Samara State University of Social Sciences and Humanities
Address: Russian Federation, Samara
Abstract
In the article the main tendencies of a contemporary foreign historiography in studying army’s role as colonial institute of the British Empire are considered. The main approaches and evolution of views on that problem in the context of Anglo-American tradition of interaction between political elite, military authorities and expert community against the background of long military campaigns in Afghanistan and Iraq at the beginning of the 21st century with participation of Great Britain and the USA are reflected. Special attention is paid to the formation of the academic historical expertise of «the British way» of counterinsurgency in a relevant social and political context.
Keywords
historiography, myth, decolonisation, counterinsurgency, British army, Great Britain, USA
Received
19.07.2018
Publication date
28.09.2018
Number of characters
28360
Number of purchasers
41
Views
1391
Readers community rating
0.0 (0 votes)
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