Scale, Meaning, Pattern, Form: Conceptual Challenges for Quantitative Literary Studies
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Scale, Meaning, Pattern, Form: Conceptual Challenges for Quantitative Literary Studies
Annotation
PII
S207987840001646-9-1
DOI
10.18254/S0001646-9-1
Publication type
Article
Status
Published
Authors
Abstract
Digital format introduced in research of literature the new scale of the archive: previously several hundred novels of the nineteenth century could be studied, now it’s possible to analyze thousands, tens of thousands, and soon hundreds of thousands of texts. The article observes the problem to identify the meaning in statistically large sets, establishing patterns and their relationship with forms. If we turn the daily experience of reading literature in the abstract distributions, after we find the patterns and isolate patterns of formal relations that underpin them, it would be the last, and for many of us the main step: use all these innovations to return to the sociological understanding of literature in a completely new basis.
Keywords
quantitative literary studies, distant reading, scale, meaning, pattern, form
Received
11.11.2016
Publication date
01.12.2016
Number of characters
22281
Number of purchasers
45
Views
2577
Readers community rating
5.0 (1 votes)
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References



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